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2022 Decor Trends: What’s Out & What’s In

The 2022 Decor Trends Report is live! See how our designers weigh in on what's in for the new year – and what's outdated.

We invite you to take a break from the chaos and join us for a fun read on the most hyped-up styles you're bound to see everywhere in 2022. What follows is an analysis of the latest interior design trends, sourced by data from Google Trends. The report includes brief breakdowns from the Living Spaces designers themselves – what they have to say about the findings, and their simple tips for making the most out of home redecorating.

Ready to de-stress? Commencing the full report in 3 . . . 2 . . . 1 . . . !

IN: Rustic Touches (OUT: Modern Farmhouse)

Since its peak in the end of 2020, we have seen a drop of 21% interest at the end of 2021. “The modern rural look has had its moment, and is gracefully finding its way out. What to try instead: Replace this style with rustic touches, and eliminate font art, dried florals, and white wash furniture. Bold black and white contrast is timeless, but replace decor with more interesting and charismatic pieces.” - Shelby Greene, Interior Designer

IN: Open Shelving (OUT: All-White Kitchen)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 41% interest at the end of 2021. “Neutrals and white homes are fading, and character is coming up. What to try instead: Stark, white kitchens are being replaced with bold colors or interesting finishes. Consider a muted green to paint the lower cabinets to transition into color or open shelving with colored dishes.” - Shelby Greene, Interior Designer

IN: Dramatic Colors (OUT: Grey Kitchen)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 28% interest at the end of 2021. “Like white kitchens, neutrals and ‘safe’ colors are becoming too mainstream. What to try instead: Pop color with cabinet pulls/knobs or a bold backsplash. Even dramatic light fixtures or appliances will make a statement. Brass is a good finish to swap in as the yellow tone stands out.” - Shelby Greene, Interior Designer

IN: Vertical Patterns (OUT: Shiplap)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 34% interest at the end of 2021. “Shiplap was an easy and neutual option to bring texture onto your solid walls. What to try instead: Replace with an eyecatching wallpaper. Add pattern and height into your space by bringing wallpaper pattern vertical rather than horizontal shiplap collapsing your ceilings visually.” - Shelby Greene, Interior Designer

IN: Wood Beams (OUT: Sliding Barn Door)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 35% interest at the end of 2021. “The heavy look of announcing your door as an architectural feature is one reason sliding barn doors are going out. Another reason I’m seeing is the limited space they bring for functionality; sliding often gets in the way of another item a homeowner might need access to. What to try instead: In 2022, try a subtler version of the trend. Instead of sliding doors, opt for traditional open/close doors – but with cross wood beams to keep the farmhouse look.” - Henry Nader, Interior Designer

IN: Tile Patterns (OUT: Linoleum Floors)

Since its peak in the middle of 2017, we have seen a drop of 54% interest at the end of 2021. “Over time, linoleum tiles can separate, making it not durable enough for today's busy families. Another reason for linoleum going out: with the prevalence of earth trends, Japandi and bohemian styles, the linoleum look could not keep up for aesthetics. What to try instead: As a replacement, try ceramic or hardwood tile, which is more versatile. Keep in mind tile pattern also plays a key role in trends for 2022 – with herringbone still dominating most homes.” - Henry Nader, Interior Designer

IN: Sisal & Jute (OUT: Nautical Decor)

Since its peak in the middle of 2017, we have seen a drop of 73% interest at the end of 2021. “Not too many people want to stick to a theme that makes them feel like they’re on a never-ending cruise. What to try instead: In 2022, people are trending more towards a subtler take on the style. Incorporate earth tones and natural textures, like jute or sisal, to give a coastal look without going too nautical.” - Henry Nader, Interior Designer

IN: Earthy Stripes (OUT: Chintz)

Since its peak in the beginning of 2018, we have seen a drop of 42% interest at the end of 2021. “Although this was popular for a minute with the grandma-chic movement, the business of the pattern wasn't sustainable design-wise. What to try instead: In 2022, bolder and more wide-format prints will probably make their way in as a replacement. This year try softer motifs like watercolor floral or earthy stripes.” - Henry Nader, Interior Designer

IN: Bookshelves (OUT: Floating Shelves)

Since its peak at the end of 2020, we have seen a drop of 24% interest at the end of 2021. “The novelty of the floating shelf – the idea that you could arrange just one level on a wall without the additional encasement of an entire bookcase – was fun for a while. What to try instead: In 2022, however, practicality is taking over, even if it means taking up a bit more space along a wall. Opt for a bookcase this year – but make in minimalist-friendly by choosing low profile and shallow designs for a sleek look.” - Brynna Evans, Interior Designer

IN: Diffusers (OUT: Potpourri)

Since its peak at the end of 2020, we have seen a drop of 49% interest at the end of 2021. “Potpourri was common in every household I went to growing up, and it was often seen in glass bowls placed throughout the home. They were very difficult to clean and dusty and the fragrances were strong and full of chemicals. What to try instead: Today, people are into the clean design aesthetic that diffusers bring to a home. There are two styles that have become popular: reed diffusers and mist diffusers. Both offer the fragrance without hindering design, plus are available in a wide variety of styles and shapes to accentuate your design.” - Brynna Evans, Interior Designer

IN: Woven Materials (OUT: Macrame)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 37% interest at the end of 2021. “Macrame has a specific aesthetic, and like all specific aesthetics, can feel niche – which is why it also feels a tad played out for 2022. What to try instead: Rather than focusing on macrame, 2022 will be about softer textures in general: anything with knitting, embroidery or chenille-like fibers. This year, play up all kinds of throw blankets and rugs; the more layers, the better!” - Brynna Evans, Interior Designer

IN: Accent Walls (OUT: Exposed Brick)

Since its peak in the middle of 2017, we have seen a drop of 39% interest at the end of 2021. “Exposed brick was very popular in the 70's to 80's to accent the wood paneling found in most homes. The red brick color often made the rooms darker and smaller in appearance than they actually were. Then came the phase where people started trying to cover the traditional red brick with a white or lime wash – a concept that has continued today in the farmhouse design style. What to try instead: In 2020, as people started to redecorate their homes during the pandemic, more started creating accent walls. In most model homes, you will find some sort of accent wall, whether made out of wallpaper, board and batten, or geometric patterns." - Brynna Evans, Interior Designer

IN: Panel Headboards (OUT: Tufted Headboards)

Since its peak in the beginning of 2017, we have seen a drop of 43% interest at the end of 2021. “These designs don’t always work in small spaces – especially when there are other patterns going on in the bedspread, accent pillows and rugs. It’s not just tufting, though: headboards with any kind of pattern are going out of style, an example of how 2022 décor trends are moving away from too much detail and leaning more towards cleaner looks. What to try instead: This year, swap the tufting for a clean fabric headboard or wood panel.” - Jessica Harris, Interior Designer

IN: Glass Panels (OUT: Glass Brick)

Since its peak in the beginning of 2017, we have seen a drop of 38% interest at the end of 2021. “In 2021, glass bricks had their moment – and not just in contemporary styles. They popped up in modern, coastal and even rustic homes, but their dramatic spike is seeing its opposite in a steady decrease for 2022. What to try instead: Replace this out-of-style architectural element with something sleeker. While glass brick is often frosted, thick and superfluously done, a sleek glass panel offers a simpler substitute.” - Jessica Harris, Interior Designer

IN: Bohemian Planters (OUT: Hanging Pots)

Since its peak in the middle of 2020, we have seen a drop of 65% interest at the end of 2021. “One reason hanging planters are decreasing in popularity is because of the maintenance involved; unfortunately, it’s not as simple as a bit of regular watering. What to try instead: For this coming year and beyond, replace the trend with containers that are easier to grow typical houseplants in. To keep the boho vibe while skipping the airborne factor, try ground planters with rope handles, tribal planters or clay materials.” - Jessica Harris, Interior Designer
Watch: 2022 Trends

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Editorial Disclaimer: Articles featuring tips and advice are intended for educational purposes and only as general recommendations. Always practice personal discretion when using and caring for furniture, decor and related items.